Monday, July 24, 2017

Monday Message

Actively work on getting your storage in! 

(LDS Church Handbook 2, Section 6.1.1)
“Church members are responsible for their own spiritual and temporal well-being.....To help care for themselves and their families, members should build a three-month supply of food that is part of their normal diet. Where local laws and circumstances permit, they should gradually build a longer-term supply of basic foods that will sustain life. They should also store drinking water in case the water supply becomes polluted or disrupted."

(Keith B. McMullin, April 2007)
“A cardinal principle of the gospel is to prepare for the day of scarcity. Work, industry, frugality are part of the royal order of life. Remember these words from Paul: "If any provide not for his own, and specially for those of his own house, he hath denied the faith, and is worse than an infidel.”

How are you come at building your storage and working on your skills??

http://www.easysewingforbeginners.com/3-ways-hem-pants-like-pro/ - how to hem pants

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ude4DLSJ5qs&feature=em-uploademail - how to read a knitting chart

http://tipnut.com/frugal-kitchen/ - frugal kitchen tips. Very useful!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0cGW8rG1Q4E&feature=youtu.be - meal plan. In summer it is easy to forget to do it but our budget needs us to do it.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hRhbBbGoIdQ - looks pretty easy

https://www.nationalsewingcircle.com/video/how-to-gather-fabric-when-sewing-007511/?utm_source=newsletter&utm_campaign=A6199&vsoid=A6199 - watch the free video. I have seen this done with the tiny ribbon that you can use over and over again.

Here is what I have done so far learning on my skill of dying yarn and working on a sock with that hank of yarn you saw on the drying rack in last week’s Monday Message.  I have made socks before but not totally doing them continental style knitting.



Here I am winding that skein of yarn from the yarn swift on the right to the ball winder on the left before I can knit.


 Here I am now able to knit from the newly made yarn cake - yep, cake with no calories! :p  See how pretty this yarn I dyed with my sister is working up.  



I am using continental style knitting and I love it much better. It doesn’t hurt as much as English throwing with my right hand. It's a skill I had been working on for a long time before podcasts - easy to say I love learning!


Just a plug for sewing skills... I am always trying to improve my sewing skills and the sock and yarn is sitting on the small reversible project bag I made a of couple years ago.

So keep plugging away on learning your skills. If an old bird like me can learn, you can too.

I am not saying you have to pick the same skills as me, you can if that is what you want but try choosing skills that can best serve your family. Make a list then number the list as to what would be most helpful. Put a number one on it, this will help you know what you will want to learn first in building skills. You can learn one at a time or as many as you wish at a time. 

I seem to have many going at one time and also skills I want to sharpen. If I get stuck on one I can move to another till I figure the first one out and go back to it. This is me, you might want to do one thing at a time and that is great too. Just be working toward learning skills. Sometimes it is pushing yourself to learn something you do not like.  

Our daughter doesn’t like to sew but she pushed on knowing it was a skill that was needed. She has sewn needed clothing items and now feels she might actually like sewing.

Share with others your successes to inspire others. That is why I share mine with you.

Since you all are on this journey with us I'll tell you how we are doing living in hard times...

We pay our tithing and feel this is the best blessing we get.

Skill - I have that rider mowing down to 45 min for the 9/10ths of an acre. I have three days of pain to deal with but I knit during that and work on the Monday Message.

I was gifted t-shirts for both my husband and myself, plus a winter coat for me and my husband was given a coat just before last winter so that is tended and a real blessing.

Living tight and using Sam’s Club is not the same when you aren’t tight and shop there. So with us being tight, here are the only items I go for - yeast, 25 pound bag of flour, rice, beans, baking nuts, dry cranberries, cheddar cheese, mozzarella cheese (both five pounds). We don’t get all at once, only when we need it.  

If I can get two other items it would be bacon pieces in a bag which I can spread into many meals. The other is a big package of little smokies which I break into smaller amounts. We have them with pancakes, French toast, waffles, baked beans and other meals. 

That is it for our tight-time items. The rest run higher than Aldi’s. I go in with blinders and don’t look at anything else this store has to offer. And I see how fast I can get in and out.

This month has been a bit plagued with car repair and getting tires.
My husband is battling a bulging disk in his back and fell on his hip, the blessing is that while it hurts at least nothing broke.

Blessed with a good friend who helped my husband get two pictures he painted to the fairground - we can’t thank Nat enough!



We were blessed by other friends who gave him two canvases for him to use.

Many blessings! We have had my sister and her husband give us their computer when they upgraded, plus I got a hug :)

Another friend and her daughter brought us a pint or so of blueberries when they went picking. I froze them to use in many things.

We got two free zucchini from our little market, mine aren’t yet being fruitful. And a good friend gave us canning jars so that too is a blessing.

We could not list them all but we feel blessed.

So that is the journey you are going along on with us.

Though we feel this year has been very hard on us, we still feel very blessed. So that is the update about us. It would be a lot harder if we did not follow the warning to have storage and sacrifice to get it. So on that note, I encourage you all to be actively getting yours in. Be actively learning skills.

Do the best you can!

Monday, July 17, 2017

Monday Message

Be frugal & bake your bread products from scratch! Very versatile machine bread recipe HERE!

    “We all need to build a personal ark . . . And we shouldn’t wait until it starts raining, but prepare in advance. This has been the message of all the prophets in this dispensation . . . as well as the prophets of old.
    “Unfortunately we don’t always heed the clear warnings of our prophets. We coast complacently along until calamity strikes, and then we panic.
    “When it starts raining, it is too late to begin building the ark. However, we do need to listen to the Lord’s spokesmen. We need to calmly continue to move ahead and prepare for what will surely come. We need not panic or fear, for if we are prepared, spiritually and temporally, we and our families will survive any flood. Our arks will float on a sea of faith if our works have been steadily and surely preparing for the future.” (W. Don Ladd, October 1994 General Conference)

Could you live on less than you make? Could you? Honestly?? Living on less than you make is key. You should try it for a month. You might be surprised.

Living paycheck to paycheck is risky, it leaves NO buffer, nothing for the unexpected. Believe me when I tell you there are more unexpected things than you can dream up.

I want you to play the "what if" game. What if you lost your job with no warning? I actually want you to write on paper your plan for just that. Be honest, what would you do?? Then I want you to save it and put it with your storage. So I want you to do an in-depth mindful thinking and note taking and come up with a real plan.

For example, we got rid of our cable bill and went with Roku. We also got a magic jack for phone service, just things like this help.

It is amazing what you can live without. The very thing you think you cannot live without like a certain brand or food item, cleaning supply, cable... you can do it. It might be hard at first but then you are on the search for cheaper items.

You will more thoughtfully buy your groceries. A couple of times I was going to get groceries when I found out our income was cut. I totally redid my list and got things that I could get more meals out of and got a big bag flour so I could make bread, cake, whatever, knowing it would be bad times ahead. The entire list had to last way longer.

You have to stop thinking of the loss and stretch what you have - NO time for a pity party. You need to pull up your sleeves and go to work stretching food, mending clothes, doing all you can to help make life as normal as you can for your husband and family.

Remember, no situation is so bad it cannot get worse.

This is not time to point fingers at each other, it is time to pull together.

Your husband does not need you bemoaning how awful things are. He needs you more now than ever. He will take courage if you show him you both can manage. It could be hard but we are in this together, we will make it.

Get out the cookbooks and start learning to cook from scratch if you haven’t already done so.
http://www.gracefullittlehoneybee.com/recipes-grandma-knew/

Remember, Heavenly Father loves you and don’t think you are being punished because you are not. And please don’t blame your spouse for the loss of a job and how you cannot have this or that.

Hopefully you listened and have food storage, what I call real everyday food storage.

You will learn lessons but not for having done bad. These lessons of making-do don’t feel great but as I look back they are a very valuable education that now helps us in any hard time. I would not ever trade them. It is hard now to see it but one day you too will not trade the knowledge. For anything. You can help others. Yes, you work harder for this education but you can’t learn it at a school. 

http://theprudenthomemaker.com/living-on-food-storage - must read for your homework!

http://theprudenthomemaker.com/blog?view=entry&id=88 - must read homework!

http://theprudenthomemaker.com/cooking/menus/strictly-pantry-menu - worth looking at

http://frugalmeasures.blogspot.com/2015/11/english-muffin-bread.html - I have the round bread pan, you could save some veggie cans to do the same thing.

If you don’t have a bread machine, do it by hand. Yard sales and Goodwill have used ones for about three dollars. Or ask for one on freecycle or your sisters at church may have one that's no longer wanted.

If you have one, it could help but it's not necessary. You can follow the recipe but stir instead and you can make this work…
http://frugalmeasures.blogspot.com/2015/03/monday-message_16.html this can be made to make many 

http://frugalmeasures.blogspot.com/search?q=bread+kits - scroll down to see kits to make.

Just a few things to think about. Do the best you can!

Monday, July 10, 2017

Monday Message


 "In words of revelation the Lord has said, "Organize yourselves; prepare every needful thing" (D&C 109:8).  Our people for three-quarters of a century have been counseled and encouraged to make such preparations as will assure survival should a calamity come.  We can set aside some water, basic food, medicine, and clothing to keep us warm.  We ought to have a little money laid aside in case of a rainy day." Gordon B. Hinckley

"The greatest events that have been spoken of by all the Holy Prophets will come along so naturally as the consequences of certain causes, that unless our eyes are enlightened by the Spirit of God, and the spirit of revelation rests upon us, we will fail to see that these are the events predicted by the Holy Prophets." George Q. Cannon, Nov. 2, 1879, JD 21:266-67.

Organize yourselves - this is huge as I have been trying to do some deep cleaning and organizing. Just that is huge so being prepared is best not left to the last minute. It really is best to do as you go, not so huge that way.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=usH6taON_m8&feature=em-uploademail - helpful info I found I never thought about flames taking our oxygen…I liked the kit she made as gifts too.

http://www.gracefullittlehoneybee.com/30-old-fashioned-frugal-tips-from-grandma/ - this is soooo good I'm running it again.

http://www.gracefullittlehoneybee.com/how-to-build-an-old-fashioned-frugal-pantry/ - again, I stress that you all learn to cook from scratch and be getting wee ones used to scratch as well.

Even now I will have a daughter ask for homemade bread for making toast in morning. So yes, get everyone used to homemade bread. This day in age with electric knives etc. we can achieve a bread that everyone will ask the same question - homemade bread??

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kM5J6ZKRRLU&feature=em-uploademail - pretty handy if you needed it to be, on another note did you know you can freeze mac and cheese? Yep, you can. I love mac and cheese.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HpBREINASyY&feature=em-uploademail - I love the store this, not that.

http://amysfinerthings.com/easy-seasoned-snack-mix - snack mixes to make your kids this summer.

How are you coming on your skill building?



I learned several things here, the dying, yes that was one, making my own sock blanks, and I am ready to start spinning.

I am still knitting on socks. I aim to perfect the FKL heels and toes.

I am trying to get further organized around the house.

I am watching sale flyers for inexpensive things to stock up on.

Still picking raspberries in the fall, will do jam.

How are you coming on your canning skills? Keep doing the best you can!

Monday, July 3, 2017

Monday Message


"Acquire and store a reserve of food and supplies that will sustain life. ... As long as I can remember, we have been taught to prepare for the future and to obtain a year's supply of necessities.  I would guess that the years of plenty have almost universally caused us to set aside this counsel.  I believe the time to disregard this counsel is over.  With events in the world today, it must be considered with all seriousness."  L. Tom Perry, "If Ye Are Prepared Ye Shall Not Fear," Ensign, Nov. 1995.

How to prepare takes thought and prayer and a family united works best. Make room for storage in your monthly budget. Let's say you can set aside fifty dollars for storage, keep it just for storage and use it only for that. Build a habit of it. This is my personal thought - don’t save it up but actively get it every month. It is much easier to pick up as you go along rather than go all at once and try to get it home and all in order. It's physically to hard to do and secondly, it is best to stagger it all as it won’t need to be replaced at once.

I still think getting it in once a month is way doable, don’t you?

Hopefully you have been following along with us on building storage in tight times. It really is best to be united in this. You saw we did food storage in place of gifts for Mother’s Day, our 43rd anniversary and Father’s Day. And the gift of the food will be very helpful as we continue on in tight times. We both have sacrificed now for later.

So if you are having hard times like us this is a great idea.

Two things I hate to do - first is having to shovel snow and second is picking raspberries and picking time is now. I pick, wash, freeze then in the fall when it cools down I make raspberry jam. Below is a picture of Raspberry Bread I make using the jam.


Get the recipe for Raspberry Bread HERE.
Remember, I hate picking them but I have this deal that if Heavenly Father sends food to us then no matter what I find a way to can it or dry it and vacuum seal it. That is what I do. My pots of spinach I harvested, dried it and filled a pint jar. I like to throw dried spinach in soups and stuff.



So whatever you can do, try to do it.

If you don’t know how to grind wheat, ask someone to show you. Same with canning and drying and so forth.

How are you coming along on your skills? My sister came to visit and we were able to help me work on one of the items on my "to-learn" list which was dying fiber. So I can spin the fleece into yarn and knit a double sock blank and knitted a tube to knit socks from it as well. What skills are you working on?



Sometimes you have no choice but to learn a skill. It has been a number of years since I mowed our nine-tenths of an acre yard. When I was younger I used a walking mower and it would take me two days all day to mow. Then came a rider mower, several about to die mowers, but in the last few years my husband mowed. Well he has a bulging disk in his back which means no mowing so I had to learn to use this mower. Yes, mowing is a skill. So I mow and I have fibromyalgia so I hurt bad for three days from mowing but it won’t further damage his back.

The more we can do for ourselves the better it will be. We help each other. I tease it takes us both now to make one person. Love grows when you work together.

http://www.cuttingbackkitchen.com/40-grocery-budget/ - this has helpful ideas

http://prettyprovidence.com/how-to-start-food-storage-on-a-budget/ - some ideas

https://www.mormonchannel.org/blog/post/how-to-begin-a-3-12-month-food-supply - ideas here too.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dYRUQ08dasU - how to freeze veggies

http://www.littlehouseliving.com/cooking-from-scratch.html - what do you think?

http://www.sixfiguresunder.com/hawaiian-haystacks/ - I love hay stacks

http://www.sixfiguresunder.com/creamy-tacos-casserole-frugal-dinner-recipe/ - cooking from scratch does not have to be hard and does not have to taste icky either. Once you find a recipe you like look at the ingredients and stock them in your storage.

http://www.sixfiguresunder.com/fast-frugal-taco-soup/ - great tip on freezing beans. I like to can dried beans for convenience.

http://www.simplerevisions.com/cooking-from-scratch-is-worth-it/ - I like this, it goes right along with how things don’t have to be the same as someone else. We do what is right for our family. I think that is why it is hard to have any one set of rules. We are all different. You may love a food that your friend does not like at all so do the best you can with what works for you. Be willing to try different recipes. You might find you love new ones but just keep moving along.

And with that I like this - http://www.simplerevisions.com/simple-living-from-chaos-to-zen/ I think there are times we crave how to slow things down.

In the first Tightwad Gazette Amy takes a lady through job income and expenses. The lady took the job to help with family finances but after she goes through and deducts expenses of working the job in the end the lady was paying a dollar or so an hour to take this job in the first place. Sometimes it is hard to see the forest through the trees. Also, we feel sometimes like we are not helping if we don’t have a job. Nay, I say! That is a wrong way to look at it because all we do is also a sacrifice and hard work and if you sat down and put it down on paper you might just find you are very valuable. 

Saving money is just as important as making money. Yes, there are hard times we go through. That is life and you are no less because you have hard times. You need to look at the big picture. So you want a special fancy house, car, computery gadget (that should really be a word)… so you want whatever, let us say fancy car. Picture yourself in twenty years, even ten years - that car will be old and out of date, rusting, etc. and you will feel bad you ever bought it new. 

I once bought the cutest little Noah’s ark set. It was $5.99 and I thought that was good. Well it cost me more in shipping than to buy it. I was not happy but I keep it out to remind me to look at the real costs of things.



We really don’t need things that we don’t NEED in the end. All the extra things we thought we needed will be in the dump or at a yard sale for very little. The bigger picture is what counts.

I one time went in a home of an older couple, I had never met them, can’t even remember why I was there. But what I do remember was that it was humbly furnished, the furniture was old and covered with bed spreads. It looked like it had never changed where the furniture was placed and the carpets were worn. It was then that I realized it was like the Velveteen Rabbit, it was loved and loved and the couple had grown old together there and loved each other there. 

The big picture is how we live our lives and the love we take with us and the love we leave behind, it's how we treat each other and help each other, nothing else matters. So live your life. Your Heavenly Father loves you. Be good to all and enjoy what you have. Whether we struggle one way or the other with money it will not matter.

Do the best that you can.

Monday, June 26, 2017

Monday Message


"The greatest events that have been spoken of by all the Holy Prophets will come along so naturally as the consequences of certain causes, that unless our eyes are enlightened by the Spirit of God, and the spirit of revelation rests upon us, we will fail to see that these are the events predicted by the Holy Prophets." George Q. Cannon, Nov. 2, 1879, JD 21:266-67

"Now you ask where do I get the money for these things. I agree I need them, but I'm having a hard time making ends meet. Here is how you do it: Use one or more of the following suggestions: Food Storage Christmas: Use 25-50% of money for food storage, New Clothes: Don't buy instead make it last a few more months, use that money for food storage, Vacation/ Holiday: no vacation or holiday until food storage is complete, Recreation: Cut by 50% use money for food storage, find fun, free things to make lasting memories, Snowmobiles/campers/boats: sell or trade to get a year's supply, Change Diet: eat cheaper foods and use extra money for food storage. 

"The Lord will make it possible, if we make a firm commitment, for every LDS family to have a year's supply of food reserves ... All we have to do is to decide, commit to do it, and then keep the commitment.  Miracles will take place: the way will be opened and we will have our storage areas filled.

"I believe it is time, and perhaps with some urgency, to review the counsel we have received dealing with our personal and family preparedness. ... With events in the world today, it must be considered with all seriousness. We are not in a situation that requires panic buying but the instability in the world today makes it imperative that we heed this  counsel and prepare for the future." L. Tom Perry, Nov. 1995.

 "Signs of the Second Coming are all around us and seem to be increasing in frequency and intensity. ... While we are powerless to alter the fact of the Second Coming and unable to know its exact time, we can accelerate our own preparation and try to influence the preparation of those around us.  We need to make both temporal and spiritual preparation for the events prophesied at the time of the Second Coming." Preparation for the Second Coming, Dallin H. Oaks (2004).

"We are living in the prophesied time, 'when peace shall be taken from the earth,' (D&C 1:35) when 'all thing shall be in commotion,' and 'men's hearts shall fail them' (D&C 88:91) These signs of the Second Coming are all around us and seem to be increasing in frequency and intensity.'" Dallin H. Oaks, Conference, April 2004.

"Too often we bask in comfortable complacency and rationalize that the ravages of war, economic disaster, famine and earthquake cannot happen here. Those who believe this are either not acquainted with the revelations of the Lord or they do not believe them.  Those who smugly think these calamities will not happen, that they will somehow be set aside because of the righteousness of the Saints, are deceived and will rue the day they harbored such a delusion.  The Lord has warned and forewarned us against a day of great tribulation and given us counsel, through His Servants, on how we can be prepared for these difficult times.  Have you (we) heeded His counsel?" Ezra Taft Benson, Jun. 1980.

I think we need to listen and pay attention and get prepared.

Life has hard times so work on your skills and get your storage in. If you feel like you are done, take a closer look. I know some feel I have twelve of this or that so I have my storage in… you have one time a month in if that is how you plan, won’t be enough in a real time of need. 

If you bought twelve boxes of pasta that is not a year supply, so go through, take an inventory and if you are good, fantastic! Be rotating it and continue to build it. Look at your first aid kits, your 24 hour kits and if you have it all tended work on your kids’ food storage. It is hard just starting out.

At the same time, work on skill building. just keep learning. It doesn’t end, it never will. 

Don’t be sucked into complacency it is soooo easy to say no not today, I'll do it tomorrow... next week... next pay check.... No, you need to be doing now.

If things went bad and you did not prepare, who would you turn to? Family, yes, but they aren’t prepared to carry your family too. We really need to prepare for our own needs.

We just celebrated our 43rd anniversary. We have known each other since seventh grade. We were high school sweethearts and still are and still best friends.

So we saw our store flyer and decided we would like what was on sale as our gift. So we got 24 cans of green beans and 12 jars of peanut butter.


We did this for Mother's Day and I suspect perhaps some 25 lb bags of flour perhaps three bags of walnuts too for fathers day   



If you really work together and are not set on worldly things this is a good way to use that money for storage. Do we have less happiness? No. Did we still have a great anniversary? Yes. We also like a trip to the used bookstore looking for things that can build a skill. We mainly like the clearance section as we have low funds. Just think what your funds could do when you pull together to get storage in. This is just one way we do it to build in tight times.

You have to be together to do this but instead of regular dinner out and gifts, this helps us to build in areas that might be low.

http://www.foodstoragemoms.com/2017/06/20-items-start-food-storage-plan/ - great ideas

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T_epZRdCucA&feature=em-subs_digest - simple to make

https://www.nia.nih.gov/health/publication/whats-your-plate/help-food-costs - great ideas

I want you to keep storing looking for deals and work them into your storage. Can, dry, build skills. Let me know how it goes for you in the comments below.

Monday, June 19, 2017

Monday Message


"Acquire and store a reserve of food and supplies that will sustain life. ... As long as I can remember, we have been taught to prepare for the future and to obtain a year's supply of necessities.  I would guess that the years of plenty have almost universally caused us to set aside this counsel.  I believe the time to disregard this counsel is over.  With events in the world today, it must be considered with all seriousness."  L. Tom Perry, "If Ye Are Prepared Ye Shall Not Fear," Ensign, Nov. 1995.

"In words of revelation the Lord has said, "Organize yourselves; prepare every needful thing" (D&C 109:8).  Our people for three-quarters of a century have been counseled and encouraged to make such preparations as will assure survival should a calamity come.  We can set aside some water, basic food, medicine, and clothing to keep us warm.  We ought to have a little money laid aside in case of a rainy day." Gordon B. Hinckley

"Brethren, I wish to urge again the importance of self-reliance on the part of every individual Church member and family. None of us knows when a catastrophe might strike. Sickness, injury, unemployment... I do not predict any impending disaster ... yet prudence should govern our lives ... We can begin with a one week food supply and gradually build it to a month, and then to three months. I am speaking now of food to cover basic needs. ... I fear that so many feel that a long-term supply is so far beyond their reach that they make no effort at all.  Begin in a small way... gradually build toward a reasonable objective." Gordon B. Hinckley, Priesthood Session, October 2002.

We lived in New Hampshire for about a year. Originally we are from Iowa and I wasn't used to how long the lines were to check out at the grocery store. It was awful. One time, on a hot holiday, I ran into the store for a container of ice cream but the shortest line put me at the back wall of the store. I put the ice cream back as it would have melted. When we came home to visit, I would go to the store to get cocoa wheats and confetti angel food cake but because I was first in line every time I bought ten all separated.

One day, I was grumbling to myself over lack of choice and waiting in line having these thoughts when a lady got in line behind me. She said don’t you love all the variety? I said you have to be kidding. She explained she lived further north in Maine. To her there was so many choices, to me I found that I was very limited.

I bring this up as I am now starting to see less choices on our shelves, starting slowly if you are not paying attention, just like toilet paper has gotten shorter a while back. I went to get pie filling at the dollar store. I try to replace what I use. Things change and we don’t notice. My guess is it now will take three cans maybe four to make a pie. You try to notice. In my food storage you can see the difference between these cans. Cherry pie filling that I had gotten into my food storage four weeks ago is 21 ounces, the newer one is 15 ounces.



https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=im07eAmvWgc - short term food storage

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IJawKxY3ipA - long term food storage

Click HERE for the recipe!
Your food storage can be very versatile. Above is a picture of the regular bread I make into many things. That loaf is raisin swirl bread.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rpzDBVN8W5Q&feature=em-uploademail food storage

http://preparedldsfamily.blogspot.com/ storage help

http://www.foodstoragemoms.com/2017/06/50-things-everyone-know/ - 50 things everyone should know how to do.


I like to store angel food cake mixes. I add a little powdered drink mix when mixing, shown above was the strawberry flavor.

http://www.foodstoragemoms.com/2017/06/how-much-water-should-you-store-for-your-family/ - water storage

http://www.foodstoragemoms.com/2017/06/garden-skills-need-learn-teach/ - garden

http://www.foodstoragemoms.com/2017/06/25-things-you-need-to-learn-how-to-sew/ - sewing


Gather sewing how-to books to help you build your skills. I get them used.



Pick what skills you are wanting to learn, using coupons and freecycle to gather supplies.

Work on learning your skills and work at gathering your storage and learning about how to use it.

When you walk in the store, ask yourself what can you get for your storage. It might be one jar of peanut butter but it will add up quickly.

Do the best you can.

Monday, June 12, 2017

Monday Message



“The revelation to store food may be as essential to our temporal salvation today as boarding the ark was to the people in the days of Noah.” (Ezra Taft Benson, October 1973)

How hard it must have been to do what Heavenly Father asks you to do?? Got news for you it is still hard now so pray for help.

Some don’t understand why you do food storage. It is no different as from back then, it is hard to gather it.

When I lived out East at the grocery store the grocer did not like me to buy two twenty-five pounds of flour. He said if he sells it to me he would not have it to sell to someone else. Hmmmm, to me this made no sense at all. You are in business to sell, order more, sell more... hmmmm. It was hard for me out east. He also said I baked too much. I was not used to grocers being nasty at me for buying food. I would have had to set him by those porcupines.

Anywhere else you could buy all you want unless it is on sale and has limits.

So while life is still that way use wisdom and get your storage up. You never know when that grocer could move to your store.

This last month I wasn’t able to get more storage but my veggies are growing and I was able to make up a triple batch of hot cocoa mix and make up five English muffin bread kits and six regular bread kits.



Just do the best you can work the best you can and get what you can, it will add up. Remember, rotating is all important.

As you learn new skills you can make great home decorations like in these next few pictures. 



The one with the leaf was Laura’s first home evening lesson she gave us. We still have the leaf and her words but what a great memory on our wall. 



The other is a self portrait by Sarah. This was one of her drawings that I traced onto muslin and sewed it in the same colors she chose in her picture. I then put two teabags in a cup of hot water. I covered a cookie sheet with foil. Once you put the stitchery on tinfoil I take the tea bags and dab them all over the stitchery. Once it is covered toss the teabag and water. Put your stitchery that is already saturated on the cookie sheet in the oven at lowest setting. Bake till totally dry checking every ten minutes.

Doing this skill decorates my walls and I did it for free using only things I already had on hand.

I saw on the news they were showing grinding grain. It is the most healthiest way to have the grain. Of course, if you have issues you would grind what you can have.

How are you doing at cooking from scratch?

For me, I store things to make cakes from scratch so I would benefit from not finding the time to go out to the store and get a box mix. Remember, I have fibromyalgia. So, yes, I need a 'feel less pain day' to then go get in the car, drive to store, get out - ouch - go in, find it, go back to the car, getting in, more fatigue and pain, and drive home. By all that I could have the scratch cake made.

I know you are saying, you don’t have fibro but you may have young kids you would have to drag with you. They might be good till they go in the store and want everything and start bawling and fighting with each other. Now a twenty minute round trip is much longer. Staying at home and making it from scratch takes on a soothing sound now, not to mention it saves money on gas and prevents you from making stress purchases at the store. Makes it sound great, right?

Challenge yourself to sit down and make a menu for a month.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J56bya1X628&feature=em-lbcastemail - this shows how one family does a no-nonsense way, very interesting.

I like how this article called homemaking skills vintage. http://www.foodstoragemoms.com/2017/05/are-vintage-skills-a-thing-of-the-past/ - I guess vintage is the new code word.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fYicgQBXkCQ&feature=em-uploademail - how to cook without power.

Do those basics with your girls and boys. Summer is the perfect time to do it because in two days they will be bored.

Hint - don’t make it sound awful, find a fun way to do it state of mind.

When you do menus, sit down with cookies, milk, paper, and pencils. Everyone works. Say an older child could help fix their meal, with your guidance, and perhaps learn to make it. You could make a list to choose from. The littles could color the menu. Everyone will have fun. It won’t take as long as trying to get it done with all those interruptions.

Be on the lookout for frugal fun things to do when the kids are home. Frugal is the key word. If you pay a lot they will always expect that. Stay on budget, you can do it. Picnics are fun fun fun! Make your own family carnival with dollar tree prizes. If you do a ring toss and have toddlers, give out prizes for a ring toss attempt. Get creative so everyone gets a prize.

Keep working on storage, look at sale flyers.

Keep learning and teaching basic skills.

Do kind acts for others who might be struggling.

Do the best you can.

Monday, June 5, 2017

Monday Message

Scroll down for a recipe on how I make my own English Muffins!

“I bear my humble witness to you that the great God of heaven will open doors and means in a way we never would have supposed, to help all those who truly want a years supply…All we have to do is to decide, commit to it, and then keep the commitment. Miracles will take place…” Vaughn J. Featherstone, Ensign, May 1976, pg. 116.

“We should ask ourselves; What are the Brethren saying? The living prophets can open the visions of eternity; they give counsel on how to overcome the world. We cannot know that counsel if we do not listen. We cannot receive the blessings we are promised if we do not follow the counsel given” James E. Faust, Reach Up For the Light, pg. 17

Did you plant some veggies? I just love how green Iowa is. My favorite place to be.

My veggies are doing great so far. I look forward to eating them. This is the first time I have planted totally in containers, so far so good.

The peaches on the trees are cute tiny little things. Include your kids and/or grandkids in gardening, they love it. I remember our oldest grandson loved helping me in the garden. Then later at the end of raspberry season there were some left out on the plants. The grandkids went to pick them and really had a ball. They ate all they picked and this is a memory we all share with warmness. In the winter they were sad there were no berries to pick but we painted snow and they loved that too.

I love that we can order from the storehouse. I truly think it a blessing in our time. I know that  a few of you who follow the blog are not members of the Church and are probably wondering if you can order food too - yes, you can. I love this.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=s9lAFTdJdF0 - powdered milk. I love these gals. I use two quart jars for my milk just to show you, use whatever you have.

How are you doing putting in storage? Do you have any questions? Feel free to ask in the comments below. 

How are you coming on your skills?

I can report after years of wanting to know how to learn how to Norwegian purl I have now mastered it! What a good feeling to finally accomplish it. When the Olympics were in Oslo, Norway, we watched when they did a little section on knitting. They were continental knitting. I wanted to learn that method and we had taped it (yes, the archaic VCR tapes). I watched and rewatched until I had learned that it is much faster than how I learned to knit. I would use it when I would knit in the round but having to switch back to how I learned to purl slowed everything down.

So here is how I now knit…

https://www.bing.com/videos/search?q=norwegian+purl+arne+and+carlos&view=detail&mid=A48025FB9409CEECB6A5A48025FB9409CEECB6A5&FORM=VIRE

So now here is how I purl…

https://www.bing.com/videos/search?q=norwegian+purl+arne+and+carlos&&view=detail&mid=49C81F795CA3E830F2B249C81F795CA3E830F2B2&FORM=VRDGAR- this video helped me to learn this and I am very glad they showed how to do it.

As you know, I am knitting on a sweater. This was the perfect project to develop this skill. Now I am on the ribbing and you can't imagine how nice it is doing ribbing this way. I knit two then purl two faster then it took to write this sentence. All without throwing the yarn and switching my hands. Throwing yarn tends to hurt me a lot after a short while that is one of the reasons I wanted to learn continental.



So there you go, I shared my success in skill building. Share with us what you are working on.

Remember now as yard sales start be looking for canning supplies and vacuum sealers and dehydrators and all the things I have mentioned before, this saves soooooo much money.

A reminder too to plug in the dehydrators and turn on to test before you purchase used. If the motor is nice and smooth, it is good. If it clanks and etc. then don’t get it, even if it is only a few dollars you don’t want to waste your money.

It is harder on food savers as there are different ways to make it run. If it is theirs, have them show you. If not, you can play around but two times I tested in front of a cashier at goodwill and at a yard sale I plugged them in and pushed the start button, nothing happened and they were ready to toss it. But one I had you needed to push down on the corners to start it. They are loud. The last one and newest one I got was at yard sale. It is more tricky. Its handle has to be in the up position then you hit the button but it has several buttons. I use the no-hands canister button, so just play around if they cannot help you. Also, be sure it has a port which looks like a hole on the top.

This is a good thing to do in buying anything with a plug, just ask to plug it in.

http://www.itsalwaysautumn.com/2016/03/11/the-breezy-tee-tunic-free-sewing-pattern.html - this is on my list to tackle.

It is not too soon to be thinking about Christmas...just throwing it out there.

Be looking for fabric and sewing supplies at your yard sale trips as well. If knitting is on your list of skills to learn, be looking for yarn needles and supplies at the sales too.



It is far cheaper to get them at yard sales especially if it ends up being something you don't want to pursue you can give away without expense and try crochet. Put funds aside in your budget for yard sales. Make lists of what you are looking for like school clothes and sizes and what you need. Then, before you go into the sale, review your list as a reminder while you look around.



Over the years I have collected sewing supplies, knitting supplies, school clothes, winter gear, things I could not have afforded new. I got casserole dishes that I gave with the casseroles to the person who needed the casserole. I would gather them for 25 cents, some were in free boxes, same with pie tins. They were a dime many times along with plates to give goodies. 

When we would deliver the goodies we would say don’t return the plate, fill it with a goodie and pass it on. Bread pans - many were ten cents. Jelly jars and regular jars for canning. Don’t limit yourselves. I love bread pans and have saved tons over the years,

blenders, food processors, pasta makers, cast iron pans, even a new aebleskiver cast iron pan, griddle pans, mixing bowls, measuring cups - yes don’t just get one set. I keep a one cup measure in my using flour can and a cup measure in my sugar jar. I keep the measure I most use in the jar, like a half cup in my baking cocoa jar. I use a third cup in the powdered sugar jar... you get the idea.  

Muffin tins jumbo, regular in twelve pan and two six muffin style and three of mini muffins, twenty four in each. Angel food cake pans, I have a big collection of many pans... cake pans, cheesecake pans - all from yard sales. 

Cookie sheets - I always made cookies fresh from the oven when the kids came home from school. Others have to work but this was something I could do for my kids. Laura's friend would come with her. She once told me, how is it you know how to make so many different kinds? So I was big on collecting kitchen things to be able to make our food.

In the picture below you can see I have a round bread pan (it was a dollar) and I use it to make English muffin bread.




Here is the recipe:



Also, be open to different things or ways of doing things. I have always knitted socks with double pointed needles but I am open to other methods. I am not bent on only doing one way. On my skill list I am trying socks on a nine inch circular needle. I'm also learning two other methods - magic loop and two at a time using two circulars. Also, combinations of things like I want to do an afterthought heel. See? The sky is the limit. Do not limit your learning.



There are many ways to do things so don’t limit your self.

Just like making bread. There are so many ways to make it. If you limit how you do things it will be a chore. Be open and explore, there are so many things to learn.

So be working on your storage and haunt yard sales to gather supplies. You will be surprised at how fast you will find things looking at yard sales. Keep putting in storage.

Monday, May 29, 2017

Monday Message


"Brethren, I wish to urge again the importance of self-reliance on the part of every individual Church member and family. None of us knows when a catastrophe might strike. Sickness, injury, unemployment... I do not predict any impending disaster ... yet prudence should govern our lives ... We can begin with a one week food supply and gradually build it to a month, and then to three months. I am speaking now of food to cover basic needs. ... I fear that so many feel that a long-term supply is so far beyond their reach that they make no effort at all.  Begin in a small way... gradually build toward a reasonable objective." Gorden B. Hinckley, Priesthood Session, October 2002.

Now you ask where do I get the money for these things? I agree, I need them, but I'm having a hard time making ends meet. Here is how you do it: Use one or more of the following suggestions... Food Storage Christmas - Use 25-50% of money for food storage, New Clothes - Don't buy, instead make it last a few more months, use that money for food storage, Vacation/Holiday - no vacation or holiday until food storage is complete, Recreation - Cut by 50% use money for food storage, find fun, free things to make lasting memories, Snowmobiles/campers/boats - sell or trade to get a year's supply, Change Diet - eat cheaper foods and use extra money for food storage.  

"The Lord will make it possible, if we make a firm commitment, for every LDS family to have a year's supply of food reserves ... All we have to do is to decide, commit to do it, and then keep the commitment.  Miracles will take place: the way will be opened and we will have our storage areas filled.
"I believe it is time, and perhaps with some urgency, to review the counsel we have received dealing with our personal and family preparedness. ... With events in the world today, it must be considered with all seriousness. We are not in a situation that requires panic buying but the instability in the world today makes it imperative that we heed this  counsel and prepare for the future." L. Tom Perry, Nov. 1995.



In our lives things happen, storms come…While we got this bad storm our plants were still okay, it was quite a storm. It makes me think, how prepared are we? It could have been a lot worse.

How prepared are we??

Are you prepared to care for your family when hard times come?

As you follow us in our hard times, I hope to share with you information that can prepare or help you when you too have hard times.

As you can see my plants were spared, which is good. I cannot feel well enough yet to have a full garden but I was able to plant in these planters that I got at no cost as people had set them out for free. I also have two bags of dirt (not pictured) that I am trying to see if I can get squash to grow in. I slashed the bags open and planted in the bags as they already have drain holes in them.

We should be able to have many fresh veggies from what I have planted.

This week we had a turkey breast it was a small one but I made turkey tetrazzini with part of it.

Turkey Tetrazzini

Cook one pkg of spaghetti noodles and drain, to it add…

2 cans cream of mushroom soup, or your own soup mix
1 c. leftover turkey cut up, you can use chicken or ham if wanted
1 tbsp dried onion or 1/4 c. fresh chopped onion
1 small jar of pimentos, yes those are in my storage just for this recipe
½ c. water
I cut cubes of cheese and stir this all together in a 9 x 13 sprayed pan

Bake 350 degrees for 45 min.

I froze some of the leftovers enough for a meal for us in a vacuum sealed bag. I made turkey salad for sandwiches and froze the rest of the turkey in a vacuumed seal bag which I put bbq sauce in with the turkey.

The meals froze in these bags, which I had old seal a meal bags to use, can now be pulled out of the freezer when we need a meal fast or for when I don’t feel well. I can just take out the bag and put it in boiling water till it is done (about a half hour or so) take meal out and open the bag.

So look at your leftovers and make planned-overs.

I have fibromyalgia so there are days I feel worse than others. I have pain all the time but some days are worse pain. Weather pressure seems to make bad pain days. So I need to plan around the pain, life has to be adjusted so I can rest but while I rest I am still doing what I can and learning what I can while I rest.

I work with my energy, which seams to be better in the mornings, and try to get all prep work done then for supper.

I try to always be a week ahead on the Monday Messages just in case, often I work it up on Fridays and on Fridays our supper is pizza.



My favorite pizza dough

5 c. flour
2 tsp salt
1 tbsp sugar
1 tsp yeast, yes one tsp - this is key
2 cups water 
2 tbsp. olive oil or veg oil
Stir together. I divide into three equal parts, two I put in sprayed freezer bags or containers and keep the one third in the bowl covered till supper.

On other Fridays I just grab a frozen bag or container of dough from the freezer and set it out on the counter. It will be ready for supper at supper time. I divide the dough into two parts, spread them on your pans while oven preheats to 500 degrees. 

I have two pizza pans the size of dinner plates that I got at a yard sale but have used pie tins when I need more for company. Yes, you can do one large pan if you wish. Just multiply the recipe to meet your family’s need. I precook the pizza for three minutes or so then, for ours, I spread it with my home-canned pizza sauce and top with cheese then with drained canned mushrooms.  

Bake till golden (five to eight minutes) and - important - slide onto a wooden cutting board and cut, this keeps your crust crispy if you use other then wooden it steams the crust making it soggy.

I made a batch of yogurt with powdered milk, which is the only way I make it.



Skill building items: I am still working on the sweater but I learned how to continental knit watching a segment on knitting when the Olympics were in Oslo Norway. So I used this week to learn how to purl the Norwegian way and so now I have that skill checked off my list.

I have several dresses given me that are too long, it was a style awhile back. My plan is to shorten the hems and maybe put a kicker pleat in rather than slits. So those are my next sewing skill building. How are you doing with your skill building??

http://www.foodstoragemoms.com/2017/05/5-old-fashioned-pancake-recipes-you-will-love/ I think pancakes in any form is a good thing with homemade jam or with homemade syrup.

http://www.onegoodthingbyjillee.com/2012/05/make-your-own-ridiculously-easy-and-inexpensive-homemade-maple-syrup.html - homemade syrup

Making your own things saves money. Think how much difference in price one item is when you make it yourself, now think about how much that is when you do many of them - it truly adds up. And storing the basics helps you have it on hand. Saves money and the time of running to the store and buying something else costing more money.

Sometimes convenience isn’t so convenient and there comes a time when you notice the price is too high. We just need to pay attention.



For instance, take bread... I think you all mostly would agree homemade bread is fantastic but you might say, well it takes so long to make that I don’t have time. Yes, I agree. Some days it wouldn’t work out but if you plan ahead you can get it going and you wouldn’t just stand there waiting on it to bake, you would do laundry or meal prep or even read. I know I read when I babysit my canner while canning and you could make many loaves for the same time it takes to do one. I slice my bread with an electric knife (gotten at a yard sale). I keep one loaf out and freeze the rest.



This was a free find for me of late. It is a portable clothes washer, isn’t it cute? I have one I made from a five gallon bucket with a lid. You buy a new toilet plunger, drill a hole in your lid for the handle and you drill holes around in the rubber part of plunger.  Like the one here…  
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=riqYz2WEfRQ

I know you are saying, I would just go to laundromat, but it is always inconvenient when your washer breaks down. This is great to have on hand and in our town we do not have a laundromat. And what if it would take a while to gather the funds to fix your washer? Just a thought.

Keep in mind, we cannot prepare for everything but we can prepare for lots of things. Prepare is the key word. If we all waited till things happened it would be even more of an inconvenience. 

Just like in a simple snow storm. How many people run to the store as the storm is hitting even though the weatherman said a week ago it was coming? They waited, why? If you have storage, that simple storm means a snow day with kids and chocolate chip cookies. You got this. Many times I thank my past me for getting storage so I don’t have to go out on bad roads. The only going out is to build a snowman with the kids.



Storage doesn’t look silly, now does it? It doesn’t need to be for epic things. This was just a snow storm. Whether it is two inches or twelve, the story is the same. They stick a reporter out filming people buying eight gallons of milk and loaves of bread. How many times do you see that along with pics of fender benders? And you say, I am glad it is not me and to know it rests on you to be prepared or be the person they are filming…

We need to take care of our families. Learning skills and gathering storage is what we can do.

https://www.theguardian.com/global-development/poverty-matters/2013/sep/26/venezuela-food-shortages-rich-country-cia - this article will show how hard it could be… I hear you thinking it could never happen here, I bet they said that too.

If you read that article you will see why this next quote is so important, they produce next to nothing. It takes only a generation to lose skills. For example, how many people here do not know how to can??? Yes, things are readily available but I have never forgot this quote from President Kimball, it isn’t quite the answer, is it? Same goes for other skills like sewing for example.

President Spencer W. Kimball - "The little gardens and a few trees are very valuable. I remember when the sisters used to say, `well, but we could buy it at the store a lot cheaper than we could put it up.' But that isn't quite the answer, is it, Sister Spafford?
Because there will become a time when there isn't a store." General Conference April 1974.

"Brethren, I wish to urge again the importance of self-reliance on the part of every individual Church member and family. None of us knows when a catastrophe might strike. Sickness, injury, unemployment... I do not predict any impending disaster ... yet prudence should govern our lives ... We can begin with a one week food supply and gradually build it to a month, and then to three months. I am speaking now of food to cover basic needs. ... I fear that so many feel that a long-term supply is so far beyond their reach that they make no effort at all.  Begin in a small way... gradually build toward a reasonable objective." Gorden B. Hinckley, Priesthood Session, October 2002.

Do the best you can, even a little adds up in time.
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